Beekeeping Help Bounty

 Cucumbers and cherry tomatoes from a beekeeping student's garden.

Cucumbers and cherry tomatoes from a beekeeping student's garden.

Beekeeping Help Bounty

One of the unexpected bonuses of lending beekeeping students a hand is how they show their appreciation.

In this case, the student was a Mom with a newborn, a 20-month old and an 11-year old at home, a full time job giving her time off to deliver her son, and a first year hive getting over-run by small hive beetles. Small hive beetles are an invasive species from sub-Sahara Africa that can take over even strong hives with their fast-growing larvae sliming honey frames. They look like little black ladybugs.

After texting Lisa recommendations on what to do about the frames with small hive beetle larvae, I headed out to her apiary today to determine if the Italian colony was going to make it.

Turns out she did a good job of removing small hive beetle larvae in her frames, they are now in her freezer. If she can find a queen to add, she may be able to have a bee colony to take into winter.

As I was leaving, she showed me where she would like to add a second hive next to her garden spot. Good location, I said, as I noticed the cucumber and tomato plants nestled in small islands of other greens.

When I was ready to leave, she handed me a bag with three freshly-picked cucumbers and a small bag of cherry tomatoes.

That's a delicious way to say thank you.

 After checking Lisa Powell Story's hive to make sure all small hive beetles were under control.

After checking Lisa Powell Story's hive to make sure all small hive beetles were under control.

Thank YOU, Lisa!

Charlotte