Providing Bees Water

 Honeybees land in one of Bluebird Gardens bee baths with rocks and twigs.

Honeybees land in one of Bluebird Gardens bee baths with rocks and twigs.

Providing Bees Water

The sounds of summer include the sounds of bee wings beating 200 times per second, twice as fast as a hummingbird, as they move around a garden. Bees, like birds, need water to survive. Bees collect water to help cool off the hive as well as to mix to make bee food.

As temperatures in Missouri continue to set new records, making sure bees have a safe source of water is important.

Turn Bird Baths into Bee Baths

One way to provide bees water is to turn bird baths into bee baths. To make a bird bath safe for bees, add rocks and twigs where bees can safely land. Water levels also can be lower than for birds so the water can easily be changed every couple of days.

Make Plant Saucers Into Bee Bars

If you don't have a bird bath, take the saucer from under a pot and add rocks and sticks prior to adding water. Place the saucer away from main traffic paths so bees don't disturb walkers and walkers don't frighten bees and you have a nice bee bar.

Feed Water Inside Hives

One beekeeping friend puts glass jars with water covered by lids with holes inside hives to make sure bees have a ready water source.

Water, Water Everywhere

How are you providing bees water?

However you do it, just make sure your buzzing friends have a good source of water this summer!

Charlotte